History2018-08-10T09:09:50+00:00

History

I have always loved pigs of all shapes and sizes and researched the type of pig I wished to keep. It was always going to be a rare breed but which one. After a visit to the Rare Breed Pig Show and sale it just had to be the Oxford Sandy and Black. I had initially thought I would breed Gloucestershire Old Spots but fell in love with the Oxford Sandy and Black. They are often known as the “Plum Pudding Pig” as they have black blotches all over reminiscent of the fruit in a plum pudding and they were the pig that many people used to own and keep in their garden.

This pig is one of the oldest British pig breeds and was on the endangered list with less than 200 breeding sows according to the 2006 survey. This has improved to around 560 sows in 2017. It is therefore imperative to keep this wonderful breed continuing. If breeds are rare and on the endangered list it does not mean that we should not eat them as by eating them this encourages more pigs to be bred and this ensures the survival of the breed. In addition not all those born in a litter are the best to breed from and therefore should go for pork. The best of each litter are registered and then this means that a good consistent line is continued.

This breed was on the verge of extinction 25 years ago but is increasing in popularity and it is not hard to see why. The Oxford is a medium to large pig with lop ears. The colours vary from a light sandy colour to a deep ginger with random black patches. The feet are white with a white blaze on the face and a white tassel on the tail.

The pork produced is a superb flavour and there is a good meat to carcass ratio. Oxford Sandy and Blacks do not put on as much fat as other breeds and although fat is needed to provide the best meat it means that they are not over fatty.

There are only 4 male and 13 female lines and at Plum Pudding Pigs we have two boar lines and five of the female lines , with one of the rarer female lines Gertrude

We are members of the British Pig Association and the Oxford Sandy and Black Society.

Pig Welfare